Is 3D Printing Tough Enough for Track Duty? Nissan Motorsport and evok3d know it is!

Off the back of our hugely successful Manufacturing the Future: 3D Printing 2.0 seminars held recently, 3D Systems asked us to present to a global audience through their webinar platform and we were happy to oblige.

Nissan Motorsports runs several cars in the Australian V8 Supercar Championship, the premier motorsport category in Australasia and one of Australia’s biggest sports. The team partnered with Melbourne-based evok3d to use 3D Systems printers to manufacture parts for their heavily modified Nissan Altimas, saving them the time and expense of making tooling to make parts.

Nismo 3D prints the specialized ducting necessary to keep their drivers cool, which is critical with interior temperatures reaching 50° C (122° F). To print these parts, they’re using the ProJet 3510 with VisiJet M3 Black material, which they have found performs as well as injection-molded ducting.

But that’s not all — they’re using 3D printing to make prototypes as well as rapid tooling for parts that can’t be directly 3D printed, such as carbon fiber components.

Join Perry Kapper, Chief Designer at Nissan Motorsports, and Joe Carmody, Managing Director of evok3d, as they explain how they’re working with 3D Systems to Manufacture The Future.

 

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